Academic Courses

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This course introduces students to the scientific tools of analysis of crime scene evidence.  Topics include toxicology, hair, fiber, blood, DNA, fingerprint, and firearms analysis, as well as cause of death issues such as sexual homicides, suicides, and assisted suicides, drug and carbon monoxide poisoning, accidental deaths, and blunt force trauma deaths.  The class consists of integrated lecture and lab each week.  The laboratory activities require only basic calculations.
 
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This course will examine the scope of cyber-crime and its impact on today's system of criminal justice.  Similarly, the vulnerabilities to cyber-assault will be examined.  Topics include the use of computer technology to commit crimes such as "hacking" and other computer based criminology, as well as means of committing more traditional violations of law.  Also included will be an analysis of the legal considerations facing law enforcement and other cyber-security professionals who are tasked with meeting the challenges of discovering, investigating and prosecuting cyber-crimes.  Since our economy and security enterprises are so dependent on the electronic dissemination of information, effective measures to secure this vital resource will be explored.  Given the fact that funds are transferred electronically, the electronic transmission of finances will be examined as well as the more basic methods of raising funds and laundering same to advance terrorist activities throughout the world.
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This course will examine the concept of deviant behavior and how departing from socially acceptable norms in legal, social and institutional settings sparks certain emotional reactions from those who encounter or experience it.  The course will also, identify what is deviancy, types of deviant behavior, who engages in it, what causes it and how in certain circumstances it violates the law by considering the characteristics of the deviant person from both a socio-cultural and historical perspective. In addition, it will outline various theories to deviant behavior.
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Introductory course designed to provide the student with basic information on the criminal justice system.  Views the criminal justice system as consisting of six sub-systems; police, prosecution, courts, corrections, probation and parole.  Explores law and society in general, the history, structure, function and contemporary problems in each major sub-system.  Also explores the trend of the criminal justice system and the directions and implications involved.
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This course examines the procedural effects of criminal law, including constitutional rights, state criminal procedure, and appellate decisions and rules.
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Provides an overview of the field of juvenile delinquency. Topics covered include theories and research on causes of juvenile delinquency; law enforcement practices encountered in attempts to control delinquency; juvenile treatment under law; correctional philosophy and practices in juvenile justice; and impacts of juvenile criminality upon the rest of society.  Students emerge from the course with knowledge of causes, prevention, treatment, and control of juvenile delinquency and should be prepared to move into more detailed study of this subject.

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This course is designed to examine the history of organized crime not only within the United States, but from an international perspective as well.  The emergence of "non-traditional" groups which are competing for power and profits will be examined, as well as the alliances between various criminal groups that have evolved, resulting in the phenomenon of "transnational" organized crime.  Those "non-traditional" groups include, but are not necessarily limited to, domestic and international terrorist organizations, the reasons for their development as well as the perceived risk to American citizens both in a domestic environment and abroad.  Neither organized crime nor a terrorist organization can be effectively discussed without integrating the evolution of US drug policy, which will be included.  Finally, the various government tactics implemented to counter the threats mentioned herein as well as the impact on the private sector will be integrated into lectures throughout the program.
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This course examines the new problems facing our domestic public service and justice personnel -- the borderless world of globalization and technology.  Attention is paid to problems of terrorism, incident management systems, violence incident response procedures, planning for violence, changing federal, state, and local roles and response planning, weapons of mass effects, mass casualty programs, crime scene operations, technology and emergency responses, the evolving role of the intelligence community, and government, private, and non-government security issues.
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Every society regulates behavior and the means, i.e., either informal or formal, with which this is done varies according to level of social development.  This course examines the regulation of behavior in primitive, transitional, and modern societies and traces the development of law and legal systems and their relationship to different characteristics of social development.  We will examine legal jurisprudence and the application of the principles of these philosophies and explore how they have shaped legal action.
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This course examines the meaning, varieties, and extent of "white collar crime" in America.  It investigates the developmental history of this concept, theories of white collar crime causation, specific types of white collar crime, empirical and theoretical controversies surrounding white collar crime, and the probable future directions for this type of criminal behavior.
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Introduction to black American literature from its oral traditions to the written form from the 18th to 20th century interrelated to historical social and political movements. Special emphasis will be placed upon the Harlem Renaissance period, the literature of the 1960's, and a work by the Pulitzer Prize winners (Gwendolyn brooks, James Alan McPherson, Alice Walker, or Toni Morrison).
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This course surveys the history of Afro-Americans from their African origins to their emancipation during the Civil War. Combined Section: HIST 0670
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This course surveys the development of black Americans from the time of the Civil War to the present. Combined Section: Hist 0671
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A survey of black history in the countries of Latin America, from the period of European conquest (c. 1500) To the present. Combined Section HIST 0502
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This course examines the history of black women in the United States.  It will explore the contradictions and boundaries they confronted living in a limited democracy that supported slavery.  The role of ideologies of gender and race will be a major component of this course.
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