Academic Courses

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This course will use a comparative approach to modern African creative writing in three major European languages; English, French, and Portuguese; bringing together writers from east, West, South and North Africa.
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Through prose and poetic works one will note how black men are viewed and characterized by female writers as well as how black women are treated by male writers.  The basis for the difference lies in racial and sexual stereotyping in Afro-American literature.
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patters, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them.  An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills. Combined Section:
SWAHIL 0101
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To pursue at an introductory level specific ethnic dance forms of West Africa.
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This course is an introduction to general anthropology emphasizing the interaction of human biology and behavior. The course considers what it means to be human by examining the biocultural interface of both present and past human populations.  Topics of discussion will include human adaptation to extreme environments, cross-cultural variations in infant sensorimotor development and biological and cultural diversity in general.  An understanding and appreciation of the how's and why's of human biological and cultural variation will be stressed.
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This course will cover in an introductory way all aspects of Cultural Resource Management and Historic Preservation.  Major topics include federal historic preservation legislation, cultural resources (historic and prehistoric archaeology, historic structures), the National Register of Historic Places, Section 106 and 110 of the NHPA, The National Environmental Policy Act, historic preservation planning, and state historic preservation plans.  The course will utilize historic architectural examples as well as prehistoric and historic archaeological sites.
Prerequisites:  It is expected that students will have some specific interest in historic preservation and/or cultural resource management, although the interest may be based in history, anthropology, architecture, law, or administration.  No specific prerequisites are required.
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This course surveys the biological and cultural heritages which distinguish humans from other advanced evolutionary forms.  Through physical anthropology and prehistory, it outlines major developments over the past five million years.  Through linguistic and sociocultural anthropology, it describes the universal features of social institutions and human behavior, drawing comparative examples from primitive, traditional, and modern societies.
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This is an introduction to human evolution and, in general, the evolution of the larger group to which we belong, the order primates.  We will survey first the development of evolutionary ideas and modern developments in biology and geology and then review the diversity of living and fossil primates, dwelling especially on the discoveries and controversies surrounding our own evolutionary past.
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This course provides an introduction to the broad sub-field of medical anthropology, including the study of ethnomedicine, ethnopsychiatry, disease and ecology, epidemiology, demography and population growth, development, and the political economy of health care. Our focus will be on the relationship between health and culture in various social contexts, with primary attention given to questions of power and inequality on the one hand, and personhood and emotion on the other. In exploring one or two case studies of ritual healing, we will look at the ways in which medical systems are integrated with larger systems of cultural meaning.  We will also look at various medical systems in a cross-cultural comparative framework.  Following on a consideration of so-called traditional medicine in the non-Western world, we will question the 'objectivity' of Western biomedical science and its various discourses. Extending this critique we will analyze the important relationship between poverty, and the political economy of public health in international development.
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This course surveys the field of medical anthropology and its history within the discipline of anthropology as a whole, from the perspective of social-cultural theory. Topics dealt with include ethnomedicine, ethnographic cases, cross-cultural studies of healing practices and connections between medicine and religion.  Reference is also made to applied research in contemporary situations.

This course provides an introduction to the broad sub-field of medical anthropology, including the study of ethnomedicine, ethnopsychiatry, disease and ecology, epidemiology, demography and population growth, development, and the political economy of health care. Our focus will be on the relationship between health and culture in various social contexts, with primary attention given to questions of power and inequality on the one hand, and personhood and emotion on the other. In exploring one or two case studies of ritual healing, we will look at the ways in which medical systems are integrated with larger systems of cultural meaning.  We will also look at various medical systems in a cross-cultural comparative framework.  Following on a consideration of so-called traditional medicine in the non-Western world, we will question the 'objectivity' of Western biomedical science and its various discourses. Extending this critique we will analyze the important relationship between poverty, and the political economy of public health in international development.  
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Neanderthals, ice-age art, Indo-European languages, Stonehenge, megaliths, Celts, and more; the major archeological discoveries, from the first traces of human occupation of European soil up to the early middle ages, will be covered through illustrated lectures, films, and perhaps museum visits.  Course also offers a basic introduction to the discipline of archeology, thus serving as preparation for other courses in the subject; it also serves as a useful foundation for studies in history, ethnic history, art history, and classics.
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Introduces students to the conscious observation and analysis of architecture and to a broad survey of the major masterpieces of architecture in Western civilization. Formative concepts behind the designs, structural principles involved in the construction, and societal values promoted and reinforced by the formal character of buildings will be considered along with the analysis of style.  Required for the architectural studies major and recommended as a beginning course for others interested in architecture.
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