Academic Courses

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The course aims at conveying an understanding of the social significance of science in modern society, dealing with questions of why science is valued, how society supports science, how scientists are selectively recruited and trained, how scientific activity is organized, and how scientific knowledge is utilized in society, especially in the United States and Europe.  Focus is on the values attached to science by society, the interest in making new discoveries, organization of research, diffusion and transmission of scientific knowledge.
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This course offers ideological, structural, and functional treatment of dominant American movements for social and cultural change in our contemporary world.
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This course will analyze the various processes and institutions through which gender roles are defined and shaped in our society.  It will analyze the interaction between individual conceptions of gender and larger social institutions such as the family, the workforce, the media, religion, etc. The current changes in these roles will be related to changes in other social institutions.  We will also examine the multiple forms of inequality in our society--based on sex, race, class, and sexual preference--and see how they interact.
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This course will compare and contrast major classical and modern sociological theories of religion, including discussion of the renewed focus on religion in mainstream, general theory.  Attention will be narrowed to a focus on relation between religions, states and individuals in comparative and historical perspective. Combined Section:
RELGST 0710
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The course introduces statistical reasoning to a diverse audience.  The main goal is the understanding of some basic statistical principles so that the student can understand research reports involving statistics and applications of statistics reported in the media.  Statistical reasoning will be taught through the use of examples.  An important part of the course will be a nontechnical discussion of controlled and randomized experiments.  The subject matter will emphasize examples from the health and social sciences.
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patters, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them.  An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills. Combined Section:
AFRCNA 0523
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patterns, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them. An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills.
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This course focuses on script analysis (the examination of how a dramatic text is put together). Exploring a diverse range of dramatic forms spanning histories and geographies, we will study how a play and its structural characteristics offer possible meaning on the page and on the stage. What different analytical tools help us interpret a play text or production? How does a play's dramatic structure and historical circumstances inform its visualization and staging in a specific time and space for an intended audience? The course will evaluate written texts as well as live performances.
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This course is designed to develop the students' awareness of the actor's process and to foster a general sense of theatre as an area of human endeavor. Students will be introduced to basic communication skills, including physical and vocal presence in front of an audience. The course will also develop an introductory level of acting skill through the use of regular warm-ups, theater games, improvisation, and simple scene study. The class will culminate in the performance of a final scene. Scenes will be selected from a diverse range of playwrights and students will examine the political, cultural and social context of each play. The course will also provide an introduction to basic theater terminology, and foster the ability to respond to and reflect on theatrical performances. Each student is required to buy a semester pass and attend university theatre productions.
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This course introduces the student to Shakespeare as a playwright, that is, a maker of plays for the stage.  The objective of this course is to discover how they work on us as an audience.  The actual work of the course is close reading of and interaction with the plays, observation and analysis of film and theatrical treatments of Shakespeare's work, as well as examining the cultural and historical context in which these plays were written and have been subsequently produced.
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The key to achieving a successful theatrical production is effective communication among all theatre artists during the process of development. Emphasis in this course is placed on collaboration, visualization, research, script interpretation, concept development and performance. Students will be exposed to the work of notable artists in each field and explore theatre making from the vantage point of designers, dramaturgs, playwrights, producers, critics, historians, directors and actors. Over the first two weeks, students will gain a broad base of knowledge regarding the roles and responsibilities inherent in any collaborative theatre process. In the ensuing weeks students will explore a number of contemporary artists and devise their own collaborative projects.  Students will become theatre makers.
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patterns, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them. An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills.
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A four-skill language course, this course introduces the student to the fundamentals of Ukrainian pronunciation and speaking, reading, writing and listening, with emphasis on practical conversation.  The present tense of verbs, the plural of nouns, and the gradation of adjectives and adverbs is covered.
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The global pandemic COVID-19 has disrupted the way we live, and this is especially true for those of us living in metropolitan areas. This introductory course addresses the current pandemic by exploring the interconnections between urbanization, globalization, and public health. Using lectures, discussions, and guest speakers we will explore what this public health crisis reveals about the way cities are constructed. By looking back at previous global pandemics including the Great Plague, Spanish Flu, and SARs we can evaluate the potential of COVID-19 to change urban life at scales from the global to the local. This course is designed for any Pitt student interested in the interdisciplinary dimensions of the crisis.
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patterns, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them. An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills.
Course information »