Academic Courses

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This course investigates the ways in which film addresses and treats the major socio-cultural issues in modern society through a critical study of the works of Chinese and Japanese master filmmakers.  The course focuses on changes in marriage and family patterns, women's roles and the plight of youth.
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This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese society and culture from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Specifically, it focuses on the notions of revolution, involution, and identity reflected in literary and visual representations. Exploring the dynamic between change and continuity in modern Chinese history, it seeks to examine concepts such as empire, modernity, revolution, and nation, and investigate identity formations in national, ethnic, gender, and individual levels. It will cover such topics as social changes, historical consciousness, urban life, popular culture, and the values and ideas that captivate contemporary people's imagination. Cultural orientations of Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Tibet will also be explored.
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Empires dominate and control resources over broad geographical areas, establishing systems (administrative, religious, and intellectual) to perpetuate and justify that control.  The course will survey the archaeological remains of the principal empires of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean, emphasizing both the modes of control and the themes or messages used to justify it. Combined Section:
HAA 0160
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This course examines athletic competition, popular games, gladiatorial and other exhibitions of the ancient Greeks and Romans.  Much emphasis on the social/cultural context and underlying values.  Attention to relevant artistic archaeological, and historical settings.
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This undergraduate survey introduces students to current themes and approaches in the archaeology of the ancient Mediterranean world. The class begins with an overview of the history and methods of archaeology. The focus then shifts to thematic treatments of key subjects in Mediterranean archaeology, such as the disparities between rural and urban landscapes (e.g., the fertile agricultural lands of Sicily vs. the built environment of Ephesus in Turkey), the material remains of ritual and cultic activity, domestic assemblages, and the ways in which politics, expressions of identity, and cultural exchange have shaped the material culture of the ancient Mediterranean region. The course concludes with a discussion of the reception of antiquity in our own society, and special emphasis is placed on the ways in which modern biases impact interpretations of the past.
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An introduction to the critical analysis of literary works through the medium of selected masterpieces of Greek and Roman literature in English translation.
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A survey of the history of Rome from the earliest times through the late empire, with particular emphasis on political and social developments during the late republic and early empire. Combined Section:
HIST 1781
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An introduction to the basic structure and vocabulary of Sanskrit.  Approximately half of the course is devoted to an intensive survey of Sanskrit grammar and half to the reading of a selection from the Mahabharata.
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An examination of the diverse strands of Christianity as developed both in the Christian bible and outside of it. Combined Sections:
HIST 1776
RELGST 1130
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An examination of ancient Mediterranean society, particularly that of Greece and Rome, from the perspective of male and female gender roles. Combined Section:
HIST 0788
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This course is a rigorous introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of computer programming using the java programming language.  This is a first course for students who intend to major in computer science.
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This course is an introduction to data science, designed as a first course in computer science, for non-CS majors and CS minors within the honors college, aiming to introduce students to basic data management technologies and data analytics skills. The course will consist of about 1/3 of introduction to computer programming, 1/3 of introduction to data management technologies, and 1/3 of introduction to data analytics. The course will adopt the point of view of a user of data (e.g. who is just combining data and analyzing it using tools) and not a provider of data (e.g. who would be implementing a database-driven web site), as is typically the case for related courses for CS majors.
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This is a first course in computer science programming.  It is recommended for those students intending to major in computer science who do not have the required background for cs 0401.  It may also be of interest to students majoring in one of the social sciences or humanities.  The focus of the course is on problem analysis and the development of algorithms and computer programs in a modern high-level language.
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All of the CS 001X courses will introduce students to the concepts of computing and computer programming. Students in these courses will learn how a computer works and how to write programs in order to use the computer as a problem solving tool. A major focus of the class will be on developing problem-solving skills (e.g., how to decompose a problem into more manageable parts and how to combine those parts into an overall solution). CS 0011 in particular will focus on problems related to the natural sciences with an emphasis on computational biology. Domain-specific projects and labs will be assigned throughout the course to encourage students in the natural sciences to apply computing to their field of study.
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All of the CS 001X courses will introduce students to the concepts of computing and computer programming. Students in these courses will learn how a computer works and how to write programs in order to use the computer as a problem solving tool. A major focus of the class will be on developing problem-solving skills (e.g., how to decompose a problem into more manageable parts and how to combine those parts into an overall solution).  CS 0010 in particular will focus on problems related to IoT and engineering. Students will be required to purchase a Raspberry Pi and sensors in order to complete the projects and labs assigned throughout the course.
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