Academic Courses

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All of the CS 001X courses will introduce students to the concepts of computing and computer programming. Students in these courses will learn how a computer works and how to write programs in order to use the computer as a problem solving tool. A major focus of the class will be on developing problem-solving skills (e.g., how to decompose a problem into more manageable parts and how to combine those parts into an overall solution). CS 0012 in particular will focus on problems related to the humanities and allied social sciences. Domain-specific projects and labs will be assigned throughout the course to encourage students in these fields to apply computing to their studies.
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This course is a series of tutorial sessions designed to help students with their writing at the sentence and paragraph levels.  Students work one-on-one with a consultant in the writing center, using the papers they produce in ENGCMP 0200 as materials for discussion.
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This course is designed to give students learning English as a foreign language an opportunity to develop their ability to write in English and their confidence in performing academic inquiry, analysis and argument. Students write in response to weekly assignments, and instruction focuses on helping students to extend, revise, and edit their work.
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This course provides support for students who are taking ENGCMP 0150 workshop in composition.  Students meet weekly with a writing center consultant to work on understanding and addressing writing assignments.  Students can also expect to learn how to strengthen their writing at the sentence- and paragraph-levels.  Students work one-on-one with a consultant, using the papers they produce in ENGCMP 0150 as materials for discussion.

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This course is concerned with music of, by, and about women from a cross-cultural perspective.  Topics include, but are not limited to, traditional and ritual music, music as empowerment, sexual aesthetics, women as composers and per formers, and feminist music criticism. Combined Section:
FMST 1250
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Surveys international film from 1970 to the present and the major film movements of the period.  It also demonstrates the stylistic and cultural interrelationships between the international film schools. This is a Critical Studies course and counts for Category I towards the Film and Media Studies major and minor. Combined Section:
FMST 1275
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This course will examine the intersections between literature and the environment by considering the textual representations of weather and climate.  We will read drama, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction work from the Renaissance to the present, with a focus on literature from the romantics to the twentieth century; readings will include a Shakespeare play, lyric poetry, a canonical novel, and speculative fiction.  We will examine these texts in conjunction with works in the meteorological humanities, which brings together such disciplines as literary criticism, art history, environmental studies, climatology, history, and philosophy.  Throughout, we will be attentive both to the literary qualities of writings about weather and climate and to the historical and political contexts of those writings.
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This course studies comedy, both its deep structural patterns and its surface humor.  We will read works from many periods (from the Greeks through the 20th century) and genres to understand the literary and cultural meanings of comedy.
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This course examines the ways in which contemporary writers in English have engaged with the natural environment.  We will read a range of authors, from the 1960s to the present day, to consider how they have looked critically at the human effects on ecosystems, and we will also study the interdisciplinary scholarly field of ecocriticism and its responses to such writings.  Throughout, we will be attentive both to the literary qualities of writings about the environment and to their historical and political contexts.
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The course reads various reflections on the immigrant's experience of separation or exile, the problems of encountering a new society, and the processes of acculturation.
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Focusing on works that offer fantastic alternations to the world of ordinary experience, this course examines works produced from the middle ages to the present day.  It raises questions about our perceptions of "reality", and the effects of conscious or unconscious wishes, desires and fears on literary representations.
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This course, offered jointly in collaboration with the artistic and educational staff of Pittsburgh opera, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the multimodal and synthetic art form of opera. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the essential literary, musical, and dramatic elements that have shaped the development of opera throughout the past four-hundred years. We will study a variety of historically significant operatic works, each representing a different style in the evolution of this art form. Every semester, the class as a whole will also attend two current opera productions staged by Pittsburgh opera. Combined Section:
THEA 0375
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This course covers texts from American mass culture-popular fiction, advertising, popular music, television, etc.  It will explore methods of analyzing these texts, discovering what these products have in common and what distinguishes them from other cultural artifacts.
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