Academic Courses

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This course examines the relations between literature and race. It views race as an idea `an 'invention' that works as a mechanism for organizing the world `which, though it emerged during the enlightenment, continues to have far-reaching implications for the literature produced in the us. It will consider the ways in which categories such as race and nation affect literary representations of different groups of people in us society. It will also look at a variety of narratives of race and racialized experiences, and how these are explored in different literary contexts, asking to what extent such discourses of race are both critical and formative elements in us American literature and culture.
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The course places the literature of sports in various intellectual contexts.  It reads novels by major American writers like Malamud, Roth, cover, DeLillo, exile and Harris, as well as "serious" popular novels (North Dallas 40 and semi-tough) and personal reminiscences.
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From the late twentieth century to the present, ecology as a scientific discipline and set of cultural narratives has risen to the forefront of knowledge production as a way to study and understand complex biological systems, their environments, and their internal dynamics. During the same period, media systems have grown exponentially in complexity until they too have begun to exhibit some of the behaviors of ecological systems, including self-organization, feedback, evolution, and emergent properties. The term "media ecology" captures both this new, nonlinear systems approach to understanding media itself as well as the intersection between natural ecosystems and the technological assemblages with which they are intertwined. This course will explore both media that interface with natural ecosystems and works that engage contemporary media systems at different scales. The secret life of information, contagious media, and the post-natural ecologies of our present and future will challenge us to conceive of Media and Ecology as a single coupled system: the emblem of our contemporary environment. Students will have the option to produce collaborative media projects that explore the themes of the course. These can take the form of simulations, games, network graphing, film or video projects, local ecosystem analysis and/or visualization, or the mapping and analysis of a media ecosystem that interfaces with the environment.
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This course's close reading of contemporary texts seeks to develop a broad theoretical framework to understand the production and cultural status of the diverse writings of the last twenty-five years.  Topics include the problematics of race, gender and class; the question of "post modernism"; and the status of national or regional literatures in a period of international capitalism.
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This course will explore the properties of tragic literature from ancient Greece and Rome, through the Renaissance and into the twentieth century.  In the process we will address issues often raised about tragic heroes and their flaws, about fate and justice, about the cathartic and the pathtic.  Through our reading of the literature and the criticism we will seek understanding of tragedy as a literary form and of its changes through time and from culture to culture.
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This course explores writing produced by working-class men and women.  It traces its textual traditions and explores questions of the status of the "working class", its relation to self-understandings in ethnic or gender terms as well as the effect of class on social experience, social vision and cultural production.  It explores as well the relation between worker-writers and the dominant literary tradition.
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This course both introduces students to techniques of film analysis and acquaints them with major works and movements in international cinema.  The course pays particular attention to the evolution of film narrative and visual style through landmarks in film development--European avant-garde films,  British documentary, Italian neo-realism, etc.  This is a Critical Studies course and is a required course for the Film and Media Studies major and minor. Combined Section:
ENGFLM 0540
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Academic Foundations is designed especially for first-term students as an academic orientation to the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. Through class work and out-of-class activities, students will gain knowledge of the educational opportunities at the University, the cultural events on and off campus, and an understanding of what it means to be a college student. FP 0001 classes will begin on Monday, August 24, 2020.

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Academic Foundations - Academic Community is designed especially for first-term students enrolled in an Academic Community (AC).  The course is an academic orientation to the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences with a focus on the theme of the Academic Community. Through class work and out-of-class activities, students will gain knowledge of the educational opportunities at the University, the cultural events on and off campus, and an understanding of what it means to be a college student. FP 0002 classes will begin on Monday, August 24, 2020.
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First-year Seminar (FP 0006) is offered in the spring term. It fulfills the seminar in composition requirement in the School of Arts and Sciences. This course uses readings, writing assignments, and discussions to explore a focused topic and examine ways in which high school and college-level writing differ.
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This introductory course covers the basic principles of genetics, evolution, and ecology.  Emphasis will be placed on the experimental and observational basis for our knowledge of these subjects.
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The French novel is to a great extent a genre in which psychological analysis has been brought to a high level of sophistication.  This shall be studied through close analyses of approximately six works in English translation.
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This course embarks on a study of Paris as an ever-evolving urban center in time and space.  A two-pronged approach sees the City of Light as both a geopolitic entity with a history of great importance and an idea that has influenced politics, society and the arts all over the world.  The syllabus features both the diachronic evolution of Paris from Gallo-Roman times to the present day as well as the synchronic weight of Paris as place and notion both in and out of France.
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