Academic Courses

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Geology is the study of how the earth works.  This class covers the classification and origin of basic rocks and minerals; examines the role of plate tectonics in shaping the earth and producing such hazards as earthquakes and volcanoes; and examines the forces that shape beaches and rivers and sometimes threaten our lives and property.  We also survey the evidence for changing climate and the future of such resources as groundwater, fossil fuels, and ores.
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The magnificent scenery of the national parks provides a backdrop to an exploration of the basic geological principles that govern the creation and development of landscapes.  The geological history of the North American continent will be explored in order to provide a framework in which to understand the development of the landscapes of our country.
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The goals of this course are to gain expertise in spatial analysis and geographical information systems.
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The geologic, hydrologic and atmospheric processes that impact the human environment in catastrophic ways are examined in this course.  Natural disasters surveys energy cycles, plate tectonics with an emphasis on how they produce earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tornadoes, hurricanes, tsunamis, wildfires, flooding, landslides, climate change and mass extinctions. Students will get hands on experience in recitation. This course serves as an introductory course for three majors in geology and planetary science.
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The oceans play a central role in global climate and supporting a stunning diversity of life.  This survey of oceanography examine the major physical, chemical, and biological processes that shape the modern oceans and the life they contain.
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Our home planet is a vast, interconnected machine whose study requires an interdisciplinary approach.  This is a comprehensive overview of the workings of planet earth in the light of recent scientific discoveries.  Topics will include geology from a plate tectonic perspective (the solid earth), interactions between continents and oceans and atmosphere, including aspects of oceanography and climatology (the fluid earth), what we have learned from space probes and how we can apply that knowledge to our own planet and the limits of our planet as a sustainer of life.
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This course is an introduction to the worlds of our solar system.  We will make extensive use of the most recent and dramatic images to discuss the nature, origin, and history of the planets and moons of our solar system
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This course presents a survey of Northern European cultural values from about 500 B.C. To about 1500 A.D.  Sources include archaeological finds, sagas, ballads, legends, customs, superstitions, place names, and language expressions. Topics include social organization, distribution of labor and wealth, the position of women and children in family and society, and the uses of supernatural beliefs to achieve worldly goals.  Where appropriate, parallels will be drawn between modern Northern European values and their formative myths from the distant past.
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German 1502 is a study of the esthetic, psychological, and social values reflected in a variety of European folklore genres, including magic tales, legends, proverbs, superstitions, and jests.  The Grimms' pioneering collections constitute the course's nucleus, but it draws numerous supporting examples from other European countries as well.
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GREEK 0102 constitutes the second half of the first year of instruction in Ancient Greek. The course continues to introduce students to grammar and vocabulary, and will allow them to read longer excerpts of original Greek texts towards the end of the term. It also aims to help students develop effective study skills and habits that will facilitate readings of Greek prose and poetry in the second year and beyond.
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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patterns, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them. An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills.
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At the end of the second term of the first year of study the student should be able to produce all the significant sound patterns of the language, to recognize and use the major grammatical structures within a limited core vocabulary. The student should be able a) to engage in simple conversations with native speakers about a limited number of everyday situations and b) to read and write simple material related to the situations presented.
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This course will survey global LGBTQ literature. We will read novels, short stories, poetry, and/or plays from a variety of different locations with a strong focus on non-Western texts. We will also read key works in literary analysis, LGBTQ theory, postcolonial theory, critical race studies, and global studies. The variety of reading will allow us to engage with different approaches to LGBTQ literature, and it will introduce you to the various ways that nation and culture shape literary production. Students will be able to identify key methods in literary analysis upon completion of the course. Seminar discussions will focus on the use of key terms and theories as well as the development of research skills so that students will be prepared to produce written research on global LGBTQ literature.
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This course is an introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies. Course readings will explore LGBTQ Studies from an interdisciplinary and intersectional perspective with a focus on how sexual orientation and gender shape human experience and access to privilege. Our work will foster a critical understanding of a range of issues in LGBTQ Studies, including LGBTQ as it relates to questions of sexual diversity, the legal history of LGBTQ lives, LGBTQ social movement, LGBTQ health, LGBTQ literature/art, LGBTQ history, global approaches to LGBTQ Studies, and theories and methods in LGBTQ studies. Students will choose a research topic in LGBTQ Studies and will develop a final paper that explores this topic using key concepts, theories, and methods in LGBTQ Studies. Final papers will also reflect on LGBTQ contributions to our understanding of human variation and diversity.
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