Academic Courses

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The greatest part of the first term will be devoted to the presentation and practice of the basic sound patterns of the language, its fundamental sentence patterns, and sufficient vocabulary to illustrate and practice them. An introduction to the writing system will be offered together with the opportunity to acquire elementary writing and reading skills.
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Using both a chronological and topical format, this course will investigate the history, culture, and activism of African American women in the twentieth century through readings of historical texts and articles, autobiography, and oral testimony.  The content of the course includes an exploration of the responses of African American women to racism, sexism, and class and color consciousness within different historical periods. Combined Section: AFRCNA 0536
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This course will explore the discourse and history of Anarchism, from its contested origins through the present. It will introduce students to a wide variety of anarchisms in a wide variety of contexts. It will follow the travels and networks of people who were anarchists and who sought to spread anarchist ideas through teaching, activism and, sometimes, violence. It will pay special attention to the world-wide influences and connections of various anarchists and anarchist groups, and it will ask students to think about hierarchies of power, like political and economic systems, not only through the eyes of the anarchists, but also from the perspectives of their opponents.
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This course will acquaint students with the remarkably long, diverse and widespread use of strategies of terror to advance political, economic, religious and social agendas.  Our analysis will focus upon terror from below that is terror by non-state actors; it will range from ancient Greece to the present; and will touch upon every inhabited continent.  Using examples from many societies, we will discover that the human motivations for terrorist acts have changed little, but that their expression has changed a great deal, from the days of the Spartacus slave revolt to the calculated terror of the Algerian revolution, to the media-centered "madmen strategy" of Al-Qaeda and Isis.  Our organization will be roughly chronological and will be combined with a typology of different kinds of terrorism.  This inherently comparative approach will enable us to make this a true world history course, moving with ease from place to place, movement to movement, while still having a solid temporal and analytical framework to keep the material coherent.
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A survey of black history in the countries of Latin America, from the period of European conquest (c. 1500) To the present. Combined Section: AFRCNA 0628
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This course is history, from ancient to modern times, of the interactions between human societies and the natural environment, including other forms of life that inhabit our planet.  Throughout history, humans have affected the natural environment.  Sometimes we have sustained balance with it, but often we have degraded it, with impacts on both nature and society.  This course investigates how environmental changes have affected the history of human societies, and also how human activity has transformed nature.
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This course aims to introduce students to Islamic and Middle Eastern History from the time of the Prophet (ca. 600 C.E.) to the Iranian Revolution in 1979. We will proceed chronologically, focusing mainly on political events. However, a special emphasis will be given to the formation of the Islamic tradition, its evolution across different regions and cultures in time, and its interaction with other traditions. In the modern era, we will particularly explore the Islamic societies' political, cultural, and military encounter with the rising power of the West in the Middle East. In addition to the several historical processes and developments such as modernization, nation-building, Islamic fundamentalism and globalization, which have shaped the history of the Middle East in the last two centuries, our class discussions will also touch on the main theoretical perspectives that have stamped the studies of Islam and the Middle East. Here, concepts such as orientalism, defensive development, and modernity will constitute our main focus. Combined Section:
REGLST 0455
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Examines historical roots of modern Caribbean.  Examines major historical developments from period of subjugation of indigenous population through era of slavery to rise of modern nationalism and impact of American intervention. Also analyzes related socioeconomic systems and institutions.  Selected country case studies included. Combined Section: AFRCNA 0385
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This course is devoted to the exploration of the historical experience of the lands between Germany and Russia from the time the region was first settled by Nomadic tribes to the present.  During these one thousand years Eastern Europe was transformed from feudalism to communism and our emphasis will be to understand the ways in which the interaction of social, economic, intellectual, cultural, demographic and political processes contributed to this metamorphosis.
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Over the last several centuries, EurAsia's domination by successive nomadic steppe empires (stretching from Europe to China) was displaced by new imperial challengers from the periphery (notably Russia, China, and Britain). This course examines the nature of that transition by charting the history of EurAsian empires from the Mongols (thirteenth century) to the present day. From Genghis Khan to Tamerlane to Stalin; between Russian spies, Chinese armies, and the Taliban; spanning silk roads, great games, and more. The empires of the steppe were truly vast in scale, integrating territories usually studied in isolation from one another, and so this course provides important context for separate courses on Russian, eastern European, Chinese, and middle eastern history. The chronological scope of this course is similarly epic, spanning over seven centuries, and thus placing in relief recurring themes related to empires in world history. The thematic emphasis is on geopolitical strategies for imperial rule, but the course will also examine culture, religion, and political economy.
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This is an introductory survey course in the political and cultural history of Modern Southeast Asia from 1815 through 1978 or roughly from the growth of European colonialism within the region through the end of the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.  It will emphasize the expansion of European influence in the political and economic spheres, the growth of nationalism, and the process of decolonization in Southeast Asia.  It will also focus on the new political and cultural forces that transformed the region over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries.
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The course will introduce students to the theory, methodology, and practice of Public History.  Public History is the employment of professional historical methods by public and private agencies to engage communities in shaping the presentation of the past into usable histories.  Through the course, students will be able to analyze how Public historians and the Public collaborate to explain individual and collective human behavior through a variety of methods, mediums, and contexts.  Moreover, students will learn how Public Historians and the Public create and express historical meaning for their local, state, national, and global communities. Combined Section:
HAA 0860
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This course surveys maritime power and the role of wooden sailing ships in the Great Lakes during the 18th and 19th centuries.  It examines European exploration and colonization in this region and the struggles for control of North American waterways.  The class uses traditional means of readings and lectures, and hands-on training aboard a traditionally-rigged historic wooden warship, the U.S. Brig Niagara. Students will learn by direct experience the arts of a tall-ship sailor and the inter-relationship between humans and the inland seas.
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An introduction to the religious traditions that have developed in the Indian subcontinent and their role in shaping the cultures of India. Combined Section:
RELGST 1500
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The course examines the impact of religion as a moral, intellectual, and institutional force in America from 1865 to the present. Despite claims that the nation was becoming less religious, at least seven new religions were founded in the U.S. After the civil war, while millions of migrants from southern and eastern Europe brought large numbers of Catholics and Jews to challenge the dominance of protestants. We seek to understand how religions have both shaped and reflected economic, social, and cultural conditions in the united states. The course combines lecture with student discussion of religious conflicts and critical moments of cultural change, using primary sources and secondary interpreters. We also engage documentary films, slides, and local museums and historical sites.  Major emphases include religious responses to intellectual, scientific, and economic change, including biblical criticism, evolutionary theory, immigration, urbanization, industrialization, Marxism, fascism, racism, and feminism. We conclude with questions about the present day: is the united states an exception for its high levels of religious behavior or is secularism on the rise?
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